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CNC Codes

G Codes

GOO Linear Rapid Positioning
G01 Linear Feed Interpolation
G02 CW Circular/Helical Interpolation
G03 CCW Circular/Helical Interpolation
GO4 Dwell
G05 High Speed Cycle Machining
G06 NURBS Machining
G07 Imaginary Axis Designation
G08 Fast Cornering Mode
G09 Exact Stop
G10 Offset Value Setting
Gll Offset Value Setting Cancel
G15 Polar coordinates command cancel
G16 Polar coordinates command
G17 XY Plane Selection
G18 ZX Plane Selection
G19 YZ Plane Selection
G20 Input in inch
G21 Input in mm
G22 Stored Stoke Limit On
G23 Stored Stoke Limit Off
G24 Circular Pocket Clear
G25 Circular Finish Inside
G26 Circular Finish Outside
G27 Reference Point Return Check
G28 Return to Reference Point
G29 Return from Reference Point
G30 Return to 2nd, 3rd & 4th Reference Point
G31 Skip Function
G32 Z to Tool Change
G33 Thread Cutting
G34 Rectangular Pocket Clear
G35 Rectangular Finish Inside
G36 Rectangular Finish Outside
G39 Comer Offset Circular Interpolation
G40 Cutter Compensation Cancel
G41 Cutter Compensation Left
G42 Cutter Compensation Right
G43 Tool Length Compensation + Direction
G44 Tool Length Compensation – Direction
G45 Tool Offset Increase
G46 Tool Offset Decrease
G47 Tool Offset Double Increase
G48 Tool Offset Double Decrease
G49 Tool Length Compensation Cancel
G50 Scaling Off
G51 Scaling On
G52 Local Coordinate System Setting
G53 Machine Coordinate System Selection
G54 Work Coordinate System 1 Selection
G55 Work Coordinate System 2 Selection
G56 Work Coordinate System 3 Selection
G57 Work Coordinate System 4 Selection
G58 Work Coordinate System 5 Selection
G59 Work Coordinate System 6 Selection
G60 Single Direction Positioning
G61 Exact Stop Mode
G62 Automatic Comer Override
G63 Tapping Mode
G64 Cutting Mode
G65 Simple Macro Call
G66 Custom Macro Modal Call
G67 Custom Macro Modal Call Cancel
G68 Coordinate System Rotation
G69 Coordinate System Rotation Cancel
G70 Input in inch
G71 Input in mm
G73 Peck Drilling Cycle
G74 Counter Tapping Cycle
G76 Fine Boring
G80 Canned Cycle Cancel
G81 Drilling Cycle, Spot Boring
G82 Drilling Cycle, Counter Boring
G83 Peck Drilling Cycle
G84 Tapping Cycle
G85 Boring Cycle – Feed Out
G86 Boring Cycle – Stop, Rapid Out
G87 Back Boring Cycle
G88 Boring Cycle
G89 Boring Cycle – Dwell, Feed Out
G90 Absolute Programming
G91 Incremental Programming
G92 Programming Of Absolute Zero Point
G94 Feed Per Minute
G95 Feed Per Revolution
G96 Constant Surface Speed Control
G97 Constant Surface Speed Control Cancel
G98 Return To Initial Point In Canned Cycle
G99 Return To Ref Point In Canned Cycle

M Codes

MOO PROGRAM STOP

MO1 OPTIONAL STOP

MO2 END OF PROGRAM – STOP

MO3 SPINDLE ON CW

MO4 SPINDLE ON CCW

MO5 SPINDLE STOP

MO6 TOOL CHANGE

MO7 COOLANT ON – MIST

MO8 COOLANT ON – FLOOD

MO9 COOLANT OFF

M13 SPINDLE ON CW – WITH COOLANT

M14 SPINDLE ON CCW – WITH COOLANT

M15 SPINDLE STOP – WITH COOLANT

M19 SPINDLE ORIENTATION ON

M20 SPINDLE ORIENTATION OFF

M21 TABLE ROTATE CW/TOOL MAGAZINE RIGHT

M22 TABLE ROTATE CCW/TOOL MAGAZINE LEFT

M23 C- AXIS ENABLE/TOOL MAGAZINE UP

M24 C-AXIS DISABLE/TOOL MAGAZINE DOWN

M25 TAILSTOCK ENGAGED/TOOL CLAMP

M26 TAILSTOCK RETRACTED/TOOL UNCLAMP

M27 CLUTCH NEUTRAL ON

M28 CLUTCH NEUTRAL OFF

M30 END OF PROGRAM – STOP AND REWIND

MS8 CALL SUBPROGRAM

M99 END SUBPROGRAM

Sourced from Fitting and Machining by Sydney Techical College

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Tapping Drilling Chart

Metric Course Thread Drilling Chart

Thread Size Tap Drill (mm) Thread Size Tap Drill (mm) Thread Size Tap Drill (mm) Thread Size Tap Drill (mm)

M1 x 0.25

0.75

M3.5 x 0.6

2.90

M12 x 1.75

10.20

M36 x 4

32.00

M1.1 x 0.25

0.85

M4 x 0.7

3.30

M14 x 2

12.00

M39 x 4

35.00

M1.2 x 0.25

0.95

M4.5 x 0.75

3.70

M16 x 2

14.00

M42 x 4.5

37.50

M1.4 x 0.3

1.10

M5 x 0.8

4.20

M18 x 2.5

15.50

M45 x 4.5

40.50

M1.6 x 0.35

1.25

M6 x 1

5.00

M20 x 2.5

17.50

M48 x 5

43.00

M1.8 x 0.35

1.45

M7 x 1

6.00

M22 x 2.5

19.50

M52 x 5

47.00

M2 x 0.4

1.60

M8 x 1.25

6.80

M24 x 3

21.00

M56 x 5.5

50.50

M2.2 x 0.45

1.75

M9 x 1.25

7.80

M27 x 3

24.00

M60 x 5.5

54.50

M2.5 x 0.45

2.05

M10 x 1.5

8.50

M30 x 3.5

26.50

M64 x 6

58.00

M3 x 0.5

2.50

M11 x 1.5

9.50

M33 x 3.5

29.50

M68 x 6

62.00

Metric Fine Thread Drilling Chart

Thread Size Tap Drill (mm) Thread Size Tap Drill (mm) Thread Size Tap Drill (mm) Thread Size Tap Drill (mm)

M4 x 0.35

3.60

M10 x 0.75

9.25

M16 x 1

15.0

M24 x 1.5

22.5

M4 x 0.5

3.50

M10 x 1

9.0

M16 x 1.5

15.0

M24 x 2

22.0

M5 x 0.5

4.50

M10 x 1.25

8.8

M18 x 1

17.0

M26 x 1.5

24.5

M6 x .5

5.50

M11 x 1

10.0

M18 x 2

16.0

M27 x 1.5

25.5

M6 x .75

5.25

M12 x .75

11.25

M20 x 1

19.0

M27 x 2

25.0

M7 x .75

6.25

M12 x 1

11.0

M20 x 1.5

18.5

M28 x 1.5

26.5

M8 x .5

7.00

M12 x 1.5

10.5

M20 x 2

18.0

M30 x 1.5

28.5

M8 x .75

7.25

M14 x 1

13.0

M22 x 1

21.0

M30 x 2

28.0

M8 x 1

7.50

M14 x 1.25

12.8

M22 x 1.5

20.5

M33 x 2

31.0

M9 x 1

8.00

M14 x 1.5

12.5

M22 x 2

20.0

M36 x 3

33.0

Imperial

UNC

Tap Size Drill Size
1/4-20NC #8
5/16-18NC F
3/8-16NC 5/16
7/16-14NC U
1/2-13NC 27/64
9/16-12NC 31/64
5/8-11NC 14mm
3/4-10NC 21/32
7/8-9NC 49/64
1-8NC 7/8
1 1/8-7NC 63/64
1 1/4-7NC 1-7/64
1 3/8-6NC 1-3/16
1 1/2-6NC 1-11/32

UNF

Tap Size Drill Size
1/4-28NF #3
5/16-24NF I
3/8-24NF Q
7/16-20NF W
1/2-20NF 29/64
9/16-18NF 33/64
5/8-18NF 37/64
3/4-16NF 11/16
7/8-14NF 13/16
1-12NF 29/32
1 1/8-12NF 1-3/64
1 1/4-12NF 1-11/64
1 3/8-12NF 1-19/64
1 1/2-12NF 1-27/64

NS

Tap Size Drill Size
5/32-32NS 1/8
5/32-36NS #30
3/16-24NS #26
3/16-32NS #22
7/32-24NS #16
7/32-32NS #12
1/4-32NS 7/32
1/4-40NS #1
5/16-32NS 9/32
11/16-16NS 5/8
1-14NS 15/16

NPT

Tap Size Drill Size
1/8-27NPT R
1/4-18NPT 7/16
3/8-18NPT 15mm
1/2-14NPT 23/32
3/4-14NPT 59/64
1 x11-1/2NPT 1-5/32
1-1/4×11-1/2NPT 1-1/2
1-1/2×11-1/2NPT 1-47/64
2x 11-1/2NPT 2-7/32

This information is for a suggested reference only. We accept no responsibility for the above charts. 
Source: Steven L Henderson’s Cutting Edge Designs
Source: WLFuller
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6 Key Factors to Consider When Utilizing a Cutting Fluid

Milling the metal blank with coolant

Cutting fluids provide a diverse range of functions depending upon their application. They assist machinists when:

  • Cooling their job, carrying away heat.
  • During the the cutting process, lubricating ‘under the chip’ and ‘on the nose’ of the tip
  • Preventing corrosion so that work pieces and equipment does not rust.
  • Removing large amounts of ‘chips’ which are produced by heavy cuts.

However, there are 6 key factors to consider when using a cutting fluid.

  1. Flow: The optimum flow is achieved when the fluid gently proceeds onto the work piece. This cannot be achieved when the nozzle is too far away from the job or when the nozzle is too close, in which case the high pressure causes wastage of the cutting fluid. Ensure your nozzle is distanced correctly from the workpiece and flow is ‘gentle.’
  2. Temperature: Ensure the fluid reservoir contains enough cutting fluid to dissipate all of the heat.
  3. Choosing a Cutting Fluid: Utilize our free online tool to select which cutting fluid to use. Additionally, you can view our entire range of cutting fluids here.
  4. Method of Supply: Ensure your cutting fluid is sourced from only one reservoir. This ensures the fluid supply it is not polluted or cross contaminated.
  5. Reclaim, Sterilize and Filter: Ensure your cutting machines are clean to reduce costs.
  6. Application: The nozzle should direct the cutting fluid where heat is the greatest and where there is minimal splashing.

 

Sourced from Fitting and Machining by Ron Culley

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6 Reasons Why Staput-68 is a Superior Oil

1. Superior sticking quality to your lathe bed. This will reduce the amount of tramp oil that would normally be deposited in your coolant. 

2. Save on cleaning costs due to the reduction in tramp oil. Thus you increase your coolants lifespan and avoid regularly changing your coolant.

3. Staput-68 enhances lubrication in a variety of applications, where sliding and rolling motion of gear sets would rupture a normal lubricating film.

4. Reduced energy consumption.

5. When tested, Staput-68 exceeded the requirements of the following main categories of test fluid:

  • Copper corrosion resistance (ASTM D130)
  • Corrosion Test (ASTM D665 A)
  • To Tangle with water (ASTM D1401-96)
  • Foam Test (ASTM D892 I, II, III). 

6. Diverse applications. Staput-68 can be used in the following industrial applications (and more):

  • Conveyor Belts
  • Presses
  • Gearboxes
  • Cranes

Click here to view our range of Staput 68

Still undecided about which coolant to use? Check out our blog, ‘Which Coolant Do I Use?’

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Reamer Drill Guide

This table, brought to you by P&A Engineering Supplies shows you what size hole you should drill to suit each reamer. When reaming, it is important to be precise and delicate with your job.

 

DIAMETER OF REAMER

PREDRILLING DIAMETER

Two-flute drill

Core Drill

mm

inch

mm

inch

mm

inch

2 – 6

1/16 – 15/64

-0.2

-.008

-0.2

-.008

6 – 10

15/64 – 25/64

-0.3

-.012

-0.25

-.010

10 – 14

25/64 – 9/16

-0.4

-.016

-0.25

-.010

14 – 18

9/16 – 23/32

-0.5

-.020

-0.3

-.012

18 – 30

23/32 – 1.3/16

-0.6

-.024

-0.4

-.016

30 – 50

1.3/16 – 2

-1.0

-.040

-0.5

-.020

 

Sourced from http://www.tapdie.com/

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19 Reasons Why Taps Break and Fail

There is a plethora of reasons why Taps fail in the workplace. Here are a few common reasons why, from our friends at ‘The Tap and Die Company:’

 


 1.  Tap out of alignment with the hole or tap not running true

 2.  Feed pressure incorrect producing thin or deformed threads

 3.  Core hole too small

 4.  Incorrect tap for the material.

     a) Cutting rake too great b) Incorrect thread relief c) Chamfer lead too short

 5.  Incorrect sharpening eg. chamfer relief uneven or excessive

 6.  Tap hitting bottom of a blind hole

 7.  Tap reversed carelessly

 8.   Lubrication lacking or of wrong quality

 9.   Material too hard or abrasive of the type of tap


 10. Speed too fast leads to a poor thread finish

 11. Tap requires resharpening


 12. Tap flutes blocked with swarf

 13. Blind hole: Below 4mm if tapping depth is more than 3/4” thread length, tap may break by chip clogging or  tap may break by hitting bottom

 14. Deep hole tapping: If tapping depth is more than thread length, tap may break by chip clogging

  15. In a punched hole the diameter of the hole reduces from top to bottom  hence material tend to grip the tap resulting in breakage of the tap

 16. The tap may break while reversing if jerk is given while reversing

 17. It is recommended to use proper coolant while tapping, as use of coolant reduces friction during tapping & reduces heat generation during tapping which subsequently reduces the property of welding build-up edge formation

 18. Improper drill size – only ‘recommended tapping drills’ (shown on lefthand side) should be used

 19. Tap may break during tapping, if cutting load is going beyond torsional strength of the tap ie. due to excessive torque

Make sure you are careful and take time with your job to ensure you do not break equipment or compromise your safety. We get phone calls all the time from customers who break their taps! Do it once, do it well!